Research
Areas

Comic Books

Comics Studies publications...

  • Knopf, C.M. (forthcoming). “Fear of faith” and faith over fear: Scarecrow as emblem of a purgatorial Gotham. In M.W. Brake & C.K. Robertson (Eds.), Theology and Batman: Examining the religious world of the Dark Knight, pp. 69-79. Lanham, MD: Lexington.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2022). Caped crusaders and cartoon crossovers: A nostalgic look“Beyond” DC superheroes. In D. Brode (Ed.), The DC comics universe: Critical essays, pp. 349-362. Jefferson, NC: McFarland.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2022). Heterotopia and horror at Show’s End. In J. Darowski  & F.G.P. Berns (Eds.), Critical approaches to horror comic books: Red ink in the gutter, pp. 223-234. New York: Routledge.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2022, Feb 14). Jokers, jesters, and gender: Subverting social standards. In Media Res, Transmedia Joker Week.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2022). AfterShock’s Rough Riders and the reification of race reimagined. In M. Goodrum, D. Hall, & P. Smith (Eds.), Drawing the past, Vol. 1: Comics and the historical imagination in the United States, pp. 212-227. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2021). Politics in the gutters: American politicians & elections in comic book media. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2021). Superman, a super freak: Returning the Man of Steel to the circus in the DC Bombshells. In J. Darowski (Ed.), Adapting Superman: Essays on the transmedia Man of Steel, pp. 207-215. Jefferson, NC: McFarland.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2020). Back chat: Subversion and conformity in dominion cartoons of the World Wars. In T. Tuleja (Ed.), Different drummers: Military discipline and its discontents, pp. 32-47. The University Press of Colorado/Utah State University Press.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2020). Bill Mauldin’s legacy in military cartooning. In T. DePastino (Ed.), Drawing fire: The editorial cartoons of Bill Mauldin, pp. 87-103. Chicago, IL: Pritzker Military Museum & Library.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2020, Apr 15). Menacing and maternal: The limits of motherhood in Spider-Man. In Media Res, Spider-Man Week.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2020). UFO (unusual female other) sightings in Saucer Country/State: Metaphors of identity and presidential politics. In S. Langsdale & E. Coody (Eds.), Monstrous women in comics, pp. 257-273. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi. 

  • Knopf, C.M. (2019, Sep 16). Queer female Superheroes: DC Comics Bombshells tell their own story. FLOW: A Critical Forum on Media and Culture, 26(1) “New Faces, New Voices, New Bodies.”

  • Knopf, C.M. (2019). Politics as “the sum of everything you fear”: Scarecrow as phobia entrepreneur. In D. Picariello (Ed.), Politics in Gotham: The Batman universe and political thought, pp. 159-176. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2019). War is hell: The (super)nature of war in the works of Mike Mignola. In S.G. Hammond (Ed.), The Mignolaverse: Hellboy and the comics art of Mike Mignola, pp. 144-155. Edwardsville, IL: Sequart Organization.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2018). Sinne fianna fáil: Women, Irish rebellions, and the graphic novels of Gerry Hunt. In N. Tal & T. Prorokova (Eds.), Cultures of war in graphic novels: Violence, trauma, and memory, pp. 123-137. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2018). Queen of burlesque: The subtle (as a hammer) satire of Bomb Queen. In M. Goodrum, T. Prescott, & P. Smith (Eds.), Gender and the superhero narrative, pp. 101-123. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2018). Marvel’s Shamrock: Haunted heroine, working woman, guardian of the galaxy. In M. DiPaolo (Ed.), Working class comic book heroes: Class conflict and populist politics in comics, pp. 206-225. Jackson MS: University Press of Mississippi.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2017). “Hey, soldier! - Your slip is showing!”: Militarism vs. femininity in WWII comic pages and books. In J. Kimble & T. Goodnow (Eds.), The 10 cent war: Comic books, propaganda, and World War II, pp. 26-45. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi.

  • Knopf, C.M. & Doran, C.M. (2016). PTXD: Gendered narratives of combat, trauma, and the civil-military divide. In C. Bucciferro (Ed.), The X-Men films: A cultural analysis, pp. 61-73. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield. 

  • Knopf, C.M. (2015). The comic art of war: A critical study of military cartoons, 1805-2014, with a guide to artists. Jefferson, NC: McFarland.

and presentations

  • Knopf, C.M. (2021, Aug). “Compassion and the apocalypse: Commanders (and communities) in Crisis.” Navigating Superhero Communities. Comics Studies Society.

  • Knopf, C.M (2021, Mar). “Mourning in America: Critical nostalgia in the time of MAGA.” The 2020 Presidential Election, Pictured: Framing Theory and Nostalgia during the Biden/Trump Election. Eastern Communication Association.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2020, Nov). “Lois Lane & the image of the journalist: Comics Books are a medium with a media message.” Journalism & News Across Cultures & Countries. National Communication Association.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2020, Nov). “Venom-ous heroes: The critical crossroads of the heroic villain.” Crossroads & Boundaries in Superhero Adaptations. National Communication Association.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2020, Sep). “Babes at arms: From firing/pin ups to Bombshells.” Women and War in Superhero Comics. Flyover Comics Symposium, Digital Frontiers.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2019, May/June). “Poison Ivy: Militant earth mother.” Warrior Women and Super-Grrrls!: Iconic Feminist Heroines and Their Discontents. Page 23 Literary Conference at the Denver Pop Culture Con. Denver, CO.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2016, Jul). “Undead soldiers never die: Post-9/11 civil-military relations in DC’s ‘G.I. Zombie.’” Poster Presentations. Comic Arts Conference, Comic Con International. San Diego, CA.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2016, Jun). “Visual perspective in primary, secondary, and tertiary graphicnarratives of World War I.” Images, Imageries, Imaginaires. Colloque Guerres et BD: Écrire une histoire nouvelle de l’Europe, Bibliothèque Nationale de France, et le Goethe-Institut Paris, avec la Panthéon-Sorbonne (Université Paris 1). Paris, FR.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2015, Oct). “A fatal femme: How Bomb Queen re-genders politics and war.” POP Girls: Reconsidering the Feminine in Popular Genres and Media Forms. PROJECT: Comic Con Academic Mini-Conference. St. Louis, MO.

Political Communication publications...

  • Knopf, C.M. (2022). Caped crusaders and cartoon crossovers: A nostalgic look “Beyond” DC superheroes. In D. Brode (Ed.), The DC comics universe: Critical essays, pp. 349-362. Jefferson, NC: McFarland.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2022). AfterShock’s Rough Riders and the reification of race reimagined. In M. Goodrum, D. Hall, & P. Smith (Eds.), Drawing the past, Vol. 1: Comics and the historical imagination in the United States, pp. 212-227. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2021). The Democratic primary debates in political cartoons, or Santa Claus gets voted off Fantasy Island. In R. Denton, Jr. (Ed.), Studies of communication in the 2020 presidential campaign, pp. 83-104. Lanham, MD: Lexington.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2021). Politics in the Gutters: American politicians & elections in comic book media. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2020). The American nightmare: Graveyard voters, demon sheep, devil women, and lizard people. D. Picariello, ed. The politics of horror, pp. 3-16. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2020). UFO (unusual female other) sightings in Saucer Country/State: Metaphors of identity and presidential politics. In S. Langsdale & E. Coody (Eds.), Monstrous women in comics, pp. 257-273. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi. 

  • Knopf, C.M. (2019, Dec). “Carrie Fisher sent me”: Princess Leia as an avatar of resistance in the Women’s March(es). Unbound: A Journal of Digital Scholarship, 1(1).

  • Knopf, C.M. (2019). Politics as “the sum of everything you fear”: Scarecrow as phobia entrepreneur. In D. Picariello (Ed.), Politics in Gotham: The Batman universe and political thought, pp. 159-176. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2018, Jun 11). BrainDead: The horrors of election 2016. In Media Res, Politics & Horror Week.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2011). Those who bear the heaviest burden: War and American exceptionalism in the age of entitlement. In J. Edwards & D. Weiss (Eds.), The rhetoric of American exceptionalism: Critical essays, pp. 171-88. Jefferson, NC: McFarland Press.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2010). Al Gore’s rational faith and unreasonable religion. In D. Weiss (Ed.), What Democrats talk about when they talk about God: Religious communication in Democratic party politics, pp. 93-113. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.

and presentations

  • Knopf, C.M. (2022, Apr). “The Statue of Trumpery: Ironic metaphor and the visual ideograph.” Top Paper Panel: Memorializing Public Messages of American Presidents. Eastern Communication Association. Philadelphia, PA.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2021, Aug). “Compassion and the apocalypse: Commanders (and communities) in Crisis.” Navigating Superhero Communities. Comics Studies Society.

  • Knopf, C.M (2021, May). “‘I am altering the [art of the] deal’; Or, the In-Sidious threat of Dark Side allusions in political satire.” The Imperial March. Realizing Resistance Episode II.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2019, Apr). “Cartoon commemoration and commentary on the death of John McCain.” Bidding Senator John McCain Goodbye: Memorializing Across Genres & Contexts. Eastern Communication Association. Providence RI.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2019, Oct.). “We are all wonder women and handmaids in the resistance – or are we?: The limits of pop culture icons and avatars in feminist protest.” Global Citizens and Impediments: Modern Feminism around the World. New York State Communication Association. Callicoon, NY.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2018, Oct). “Pun dites: Artists’ re-framing of Trump’s words.” Trump Time: Communication Lessons or Trump’s Communication Primer. New York State Communication Association. Callicoon, NY.

protestors at Capitol
 
 
WWI soldier walking

Civil-Military Studies publications...

  • Knopf, C.M. (2021). “Like his dad”: Epistolic constructions of American children in World War II. Home Front Studies, 1(1), 59-83.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2020). Back chat: Subversion and conformity in dominion cartoons of the World Wars. In T. Tuleja (Ed.), Different drummers: Military discipline and its discontents, pp. 32-47. The University Press of Colorado/Utah State University Press.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2020). Bill Mauldin’s legacy in military cartooning. In T. DePastino (Ed.), Drawing fire: The editorial cartoons of Bill Mauldin, pp. 87-103. Chicago, IL: Pritzker Military Museum & Library.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2019). War is hell: The (super)nature of war in the works of Mike Mignola. In S.G. Hammond (Ed.), The Mignolaverse: Hellboy and the comics art of Mike Mignola, pp. 144-155. Edwardsville, IL: Sequart Organization.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2018). Sinne fianna fáil: Women, Irish rebellions, and the graphic novels of Gerry Hunt. In N. Tal & T. Prorokova (Eds.), Cultures of war in graphic novels: Violence, trauma, and memory, pp. 123-137. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2017). “Hey, soldier! - Your slip is showing!”: Militarism vs. femininity in WWII comic pages and books. In J. Kimble & T. Goodnow (Eds.), The 10 cent war: Comic books, propaganda, and World War II, pp. 26-45. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2016). Zany zombies, grinning ghosts, silly scientists, and nasty Nazis: Comedy-horror at the threshold of World War II. In C.J. Miller & A.B. VanRiper (Eds.), The laughing dead: The comedy-horror film from Bride of Frankenstein to Zombieland, pp. 25-38. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.

  • Knopf, C.M. & Doran, C.M. (2016). PTXD: Gendered narratives of combat, trauma, and the civil-military divide. In C. Bucciferro (Ed.), The X-Men films: A cultural analysis, pp. 61-73.  Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield. 

  • Knopf, C.M. (2015). The comic art of war: A critical study of military cartoons, 1805-2014, with a guide to artists. Jefferson, NC: McFarland.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2015). The U.N.dead: Cold War ghosts in Carol for another Christmas. In C.J. Miller & A.B. Van Riper (Eds.), Horrors of war: The undead on the battlefield, pp. 136-53. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2014). Sense-making and map-making: War letters as personal geographies. NANO , 6/Cartography & Narrative.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2012). Relational dialectics in the civil-military relationship: Lessons from veterans’ transition narratives. Political & Military Sociology: An Annual Review, 40, 171-192.

  • Knopf, C.M. & Ziegelmayer, E.J. (2012). Fourth generation warfare & the US military’s social media strategy: Promoting the academic conversation. Air & Space Power Journal – Africa & Francophonie, Q4: 3-22.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2011). Those who bear the heaviest burden: War and American exceptionalism in the age of entitlement. In J. Edwards & D. Weiss (Eds.), The rhetoric of American exceptionalism: Critical essays, pp. 171-88. Jefferson, NC: McFarland.

and presentations

  • Knopf, C.M. (2020, Sep). “Babes at arms: From firing/pin ups to Bombshells.” Women and War in Superhero Comics. Flyover Comics Symposium, Digital Frontiers. Virtual conference.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2019, Sep). “Animating #VeteransVoices: StoryCorps, cartoons, and the civil-military gap.” Animation and Public Engagement Symposium. Lubbock, TX.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2017, Mar). The Military in Cartoon: Veteran Comic Creators – a Panel Discussion. Border Town Comic-Con. Ontario, OR.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2016, Jul). “Undead soldiers never die: Post-9/11 civil-military relations in DC’s ‘G.I. Zombie.’” Poster Presentations. Comic Arts Conference at Comic Con International. San Diego, CA.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2016, Aug). “Animating the war effort: Cartoons of World War II.” Spirit of Revolution on the Home Front, National Parks of Boston. National Parks Service Centennial Celebration. USS Constitution Museum. Boston, MA.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2016, Jun). “Visual perspective in primary, secondary, and tertiary graphicnarratives of World War I.” Images, Imageries, Imaginaires. Colloque Guerres et BD: Écrire une histoire nouvelle de l’Europe, Bibliothèque Nationale de France, et le Goethe-Institut Paris, avec la Panthéon-Sorbonne (Université Paris 1). Paris, FR.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2016, Mar). “Baby girls, little men, and kiddos: Family roles and social constructions of the children of World War II.” Military Families. Military Sociology Mini-Conference, Eastern Sociological Society. Boston, MA.

  • Ziegelmayer, E.J. & Knopf, C.M. (2012, Apr). “Global communication in tribal battles: Development and meaning of the U.S. military’s Information Operations Doctrine.” Communicating War in the Information Age. International Studies Association Annual Convention: San Diego, CA.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2011, May). “Materiality and commoditization of war correspondence, from snail-mail to e-mail.” Mediating War and Technology Preconference. International Communication Association. Boston, MA.

  • Knopf, C.M. & Ziegelmayer, E.J. (2010, Sep). “‘Friending’ the enemy: The US military,strategic communication, and social media in the War on Terror.” Social Media I. Global Media & ‘the War Terror’: An International Conference, sponsored by the Communication and Media Research Institute at the University of Westminster. London, GB.

 

Spectral/Monstros-ities publications...

  • Knopf, C.M. (2022). Cthulhoo-Dooby-Doo!: The re-animation of Lovecraft (and racism) through subcultural capital. In T. Lanzendörfer & M.J. Dreysse Passos de Cavalho (Eds.), The medial afterlives of H.P. Lovecraft: Comic, film, podcast, TV, games. Palgrave Macmillan.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2022). Shark storms: Syfy’s splasher and splashstick films. In J. Wigard & M. Ploskonka (Eds.), Attack of the new B movies: Essays on SYFY original films. Jefferson, NC: McFarland.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2022). Heterotopia and horror at Show’s End. In J. Darowski  & F.G.P. Berns (Eds.), Critical approaches to horror comic books: Red ink in the gutter, pp. 223-234. New York: Routledge.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2020). The American nightmare: Graveyard voters, demon sheep, devil women, and lizard people. D. Picariello, ed. The politics of horror, pp. 3-16. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2020). UFO (unusual female other) sightings in Saucer Country/State: Metaphors of identity and presidential politics. In S. Langsdale & E. Coody (Eds.), Monstrous women in comics, pp. 257-273. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi. 

  • Knopf, C.M. (2019). Politics as “the sum of everything you fear”: Scarecrow as phobia entrepreneur. In D. Picariello (Ed.), Politics in Gotham: The Batman universe and political thought, pp. 159-176. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2019). War is hell: The (super)nature of war in the works of Mike Mignola. In S.G. Hammond (Ed.), The Mignolaverse: Hellboy and the comics art of Mike Mignola, pp. 144-155. Edwardsville, IL: Sequart Organization.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2018). Marvel’s Shamrock: Haunted heroine, working woman, guardian of the galaxy. In M. DiPaolo (Ed.), Working class comic book heroes: Class conflict and populist politics in comics, pp. 206-225. Jackson MS: University Press of Mississippi.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2018, Jun 11). BrainDead: The horrors of election 2016. In Media Res, Politics & Horror Week.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2016). Zany zombies, grinning ghosts, silly scientists, and nasty Nazis: Comedy-horror at the threshold of World War II. In C.J. Miller & A.B. VanRiper (Eds.), The laughing dead: The comedy-horror film from Bride of Frankenstein to Zombieland, pp. 25-38. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2015). The U.N.dead: Cold War ghosts in Carol for another Christmas. In C.J. Miller & A.B. Van Riper (Eds.), Horrors of war: The undead on the battlefield, pp. 136-53. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.

and presentations

  • Knopf, C.M. (2018, Oct). “Campaign carnage: Horror and politics in comic books.” Political Horror. Popular Culture Association, South/American Culture Association, South. New Orleans, LA.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2017, May). “Sighting UFOs (unusual female others) in Saucer Country: Metaphors of identity and politics.” Monstrous Women in Comics Conference. University of North Texas. Denton, TX.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2017, Apr). “A rhetoric of monstrosity: Towards a definition of the American political horror genre.” Humor, horror, and pop culture in politics. Eastern Communication Association. Boston, MA.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2016, Jul). “Undead soldiers never die: Post-9/11 civil-military relations in DC’s ‘G.I. Zombie.’” Poster Presentations. Comic Arts Conference, Comic Con International. San Diego, CA.

gothic lantern
 
gender bathroom symbols

Gender publications...

  • Knopf, C.M. (2022, Feb 14). Jokers, jesters, and gender: Subverting social standards. In Media Res, Transmedia Joker Week.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2020, Apr 15). Menacing and maternal: The limits of motherhood in Spider-Man. In Media Res, Spider-Man Week.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2020). UFO (unusual female other) sightings in Saucer Country/State: Metaphors of identity and presidential politics. In S. Langsdale & E. Coody (Eds.), Monstrous women in comics, pp. 257-273. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi. 

  • Knopf, C.M. (2019, Dec). “Carrie Fisher sent me”: Princess Leia as an avatar of resistance in the Women’s March(es). Unbound: A Journal of Digital Scholarship, 1(1).

  • Knopf, C.M. (2019, Sep 16). Queer female Superheroes: DC Comics Bombshells tell their own story. FLOW: A Critical Forum on Media and Culture, 26(1) “New Faces, New Voices, New Bodies.”

  • Knopf, C.M. (2018). Sinne fianna fáil: Women, Irish rebellions, and the graphic novels of Gerry Hunt. In N. Tal & T. Prorokova (Eds.), Cultures of war in graphic novels: Violence, trauma, and memory, pp. 123-137. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2018). Queen of burlesque: The subtle (as a hammer) satire of Bomb Queen. In M. Goodrum, T. Prescott, & P. Smith (Eds.), Gender and the superhero narrative, pp. 101-123. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2018). Marvel’s Shamrock: Haunted heroine, working woman, guardian of the galaxy. In M. DiPaolo (Ed.), Working class comic book heroes: Class conflict and populist politics in comics, pp. 206-225. Jackson MS: University Press of Mississippi.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2017). “Hey, soldier! - Your slip is showing!”: Militarism vs. femininity in WWII comic pages and books. In J. Kimble & T. Goodnow (Eds.), The 10 cent war: Comic books, propaganda, and World War II, pp. 26-45. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi.

  • Knopf, C.M. & Doran, C.M. (2016). PTXD: Gendered narratives of combat, trauma, and the civil-military divide.  In C. Bucciferro (Ed.), The X-Men films: A cultural analysis, pp. 61-73.  Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.

and presentations

  • Knopf, C.M. (2020, Sep). “Babes at arms: From firing/pin ups to Bombshells.” Women and War in Superhero Comics. Flyover Comics Symposium, Digital Frontiers. Virtual conference.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2019, Oct.). “We are all wonder women and handmaids in the resistance – or are we?: The limits of pop culture icons and avatars in feminist protest.” Global Citizens and Impediments: Modern Feminism around the World. New York State Communication Association. Callicoon, NY.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2019, May/June). “Poison Ivy: Militant earth mother.” Warrior Women and Super-Grrrls!: Iconic Feminist Heroines and Their Discontents. Page 23 Literary Conference at the Denver Pop Culture Con. Denver, CO.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2015, Oct). “A fatal femme: How Bomb Queen re-genders politics and war.” POP Girls: Reconsidering the Feminine in Popular Genres and Media Forms. PROJECT: Comic Con Academic Mini-Conference. St. Louis, MO.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2015, Aug). “Making love and war: (Erotic) sexual politics of war revealed in letters of an American military couple.” Section on the Sociology of the Family Roundtable: Sexuality. American Sociological Association. Chicago, IL.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2007, Nov). “Participatory communication practices in Dianic Wicca: Witchcraft as third wave feminist action.” Second and Third Wave Feminism and Beyond. National Communication Association. Chicago, IL.

 

Humor Studies publications...

  • Knopf, C.M. (2020). Back chat: Subversion and conformity in dominion cartoons of the World Wars. In T. Tuleja (Ed.), Different drummers: Military discipline and its discontents, pp. 32-47. The University Press of Colorado/Utah State University Press.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2020). Bill Mauldin’s legacy in military cartooning. In T. DePastino (Ed.), Drawing fire: The editorial cartoons of Bill Mauldin, pp. 87-103. Chicago, IL: Pritzker Military Museum & Library.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2018). Queen of burlesque: The subtle (as a hammer) satire of Bomb Queen. In M. Goodrum, T. Prescott, & P. Smith (Eds.), Gender and the superhero narrative, pp. 101-123. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2017). “Hey, soldier! - Your slip is showing!”: Militarism vs. femininity in WWII comic pages and books. In J. Kimble & T. Goodnow (Eds.), The 10 cent war: Comic books, propaganda, and World War II, pp. 26-45. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2016). Zany zombies, grinning ghosts, silly scientists, and nasty Nazis: Comedy-horror at the threshold of World War II. In C.J. Miller & A.B. VanRiper (Eds.), The laughing dead: The comedy-horror film from Bride of Frankenstein to Zombieland, pp. 25-38. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2015). The comic art of war: A critical study of military cartoons, 1805-2014, with a guide to artists. Jefferson, NC: McFarland.

and presentations

  • Knopf, C.M. (2022, Apr). “The Statue of Trumpery: Ironic metaphor and the visual ideograph.” Top Paper Panel: Memorializing Public Messages of American Presidents. Eastern Communication Association. Philadelphia, PA.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2021, May). “‘I am altering the [art of the] deal’; Or, the In-Sidious threat of Dark Side allusions in political satire.” The Imperial March. Realizing Resistance Episode II. Online.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2020, Nov). “Light comedy or reality TV? Political cartoonists frame the 2020 Democratic primary debates.” Analyzing Communication in the 2020 Presidential Primary Debates: Strategic Innovation and Interaction in a Shifting Scene. National Communication Association. Zoom.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2019, Jul). “Presidential superzeroes: Parody or punditry in comic book political satire. Comics Studies Society. Toronto, ON.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2018, Nov). “Playful politics in political parodies: Editorial cartoons in comic book form.” Politics in Play: Satire, Affect, and Cartoons. National Communication Association. Salt Lake City, UT.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2014, Feb). “Guns and cockpits, weapons of wits: Gender and sexuality in the military as expressed in soldier-drawn comics.” U.S. Military Economies and Cultures. Eastern Sociological Society. Baltimore, MD.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2013, Nov). “Doctrine Man draws for jargon, bureaucracy, and the military way: Comic representations of US military doctrine.” Media as Data; Media as Method. International Studies Association–Northeast. Providence, RI.

Dog wearing funny glasses
 
Cathedral interior

Civil/Public Religion publications...

  • Knopf, C.M. (2022). “Fear of faith” and faith over fear: Scarecrow as emblem of a purgatorial Gotham. In M.W. Brake & C.K. Robertson (Eds.), Theology and Batman: Examining the religious world of the Dark Knight, pp. 69-79. Lanham, MD: Lexington.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2011). Those who bear the heaviest burden: War and American exceptionalism in the age of entitlement. In J. Edwards & D. Weiss (Eds.), The rhetoric of American exceptionalism: Critical essays, pp. 171-88. Jefferson, NC: McFarland.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2010). Al Gore’s rational faith and unreasonable religion. In D. Weiss (Ed.),What Democrats talk about when they talk about God: Religious communication in Democratic party politics, pp. 93-113. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books

  • Knopf, C.M. (2005). Providence, presidents, & the press: Inaugural rhetoric of religion in a historical perspective. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University at Albany.

and presentations

  • Knopf, C.M. (2009, Nov). “Speaking to one god but addressing many: The inaugural address as counterweight to the inaugural prayer.” Let “Us” Pray: Rhetoric, Religion, and the 2009 Presidential Inauguration. National Communication Association. Chicago, IL.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2008, May). “Perspectives on piety: The press’s use of incongruity.” Rhetoric, Religion, and the Rhetoric of Religion: Perspectives and Prospects. Rhetoric Society of America. Seattle, WA.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2008, May). “IR, PR, the E.U. & the U.S.: Bush’s and Chirac’s conflicting sacred/secular national identities regarding Iraq.” Bent Emotions: Perspectives on Foreign Policy and Candidate Evaluations. Eastern Communication Association. Pittsburgh, PA.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2007, Nov). “Participatory communication practices in Dianic Wicca: Witchcraft as third wave feminist action.” Second and Third Wave Feminism and Beyond. National Communication Association. Chicago, IL.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2006, Apr). “Like gathering moonbeams: Challenges facing the solidification and reinforcement of Pagan Pride.” Constructions of Self and Other: Selected Papers in Voices of Diversity. Eastern Communication Association. Philadelphia, PA.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2004, Apr). “Looking to heaven for answers: A computer-based rhetorical critique of Christian sermons following the Oklahoma City bombing & the 9/11 terrorist attacks.” The Progress of Life & Death: Rhetorical Evocation & Response. Eastern Communication Association. Boston, MA.

 
 

Circus Studies publications...

  • Knopf, C.M. (2022). Heterotopia and horror at Show’s End. In J. Darowski  & F.G.P. Berns (Eds.), Critical approaches to horror comic books: Red ink in the gutter, pp. 223-234. New York: Routledge.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2022, Feb 14). Jokers, jesters, and gender: Subverting social standards. In Media Res, Transmedia Joker Week.

  • Knopf, C.M. (2021). Superman, a super freak: Returning the Man of Steel to the circus in the DC Bombshells. In J. Darowski (Ed.), Adapting Superman: Essays on the transmedia Man of Steel, pp. 207-215. Jefferson, NC: McFarland.

Circus Tent at night
Mickey Mouse

Animation Studies publications...

  • Knopf, C.M. (2022). Cthulhoo-Dooby-Doo!: The re-animation of Lovecraft (and racism) through subcultural capital. In T. Lanzendörfer & M.J. Dreysse Passos de Cavalho (Eds.), The medial afterlives of H.P. Lovecraft: Comic, film, podcast, TV, games. Palgrave Macmillan.

and presentations

  • Knopf, C.M. (2019, Sep). “Animating #VeteransVoices: StoryCorps, cartoons, and the civil-military gap.” Animation and Public Engagement Symposium. Lubbock, TX.

 
Vintage Comic Books